Hello! I am taking part of the wonderful series organized by the lovely ladies at

Simple Simon & CO

 today and bringing home a skirt tutorial I did a year ago over at the Sewing Rabbit. Everyone can take part of Skirting Issue- the idea is to sew up some skirts to then be donated to foster care centers. I mean what a great idea! You can read a lot more about it

HERE

and see how you can help. How about you try my very easy Reversible paper bag skirt to donate? 

Today's tutorial is for a simple reversible paper bag skirt with lot's of flare and flat felled seams. I will provide you with the measurements I used, however fell free to play around as you can get many different looks depending on how much fabric you decide to use. 

I made my daughters and mine slightly different, specially at the waist, all in all it's really all the same technique. Are you ready to get started? Not too fast, first lets learn how to make flat felled seams! 

This type of seam is great for making things reversible, for finishing bags without lining and is often used in denim.

***Don't forget to sew at 2cm from the edge for your first seam.

What you will need:

- Fabric A & B: For Fabric A, I used my daughters old swaddle blankets and for fabric B I used a 100% cotton which I found in the quilting section at the fabric store. Have fun with your fabrics, make one side quirkier than the other! I made sure both sides matched since you can see a little of the reverse on one of the sides. 

- Bias tape ( as long as the circumference of your skirt). I bought mine at the fabric store, but you could use

Mie's technique

- Elastic, mine is 0.75 cm wide. I used 2 strips for my daughters skirt and 4 in mine. 

You could use a wider elastic too if you like. I just thought the effect was pretty with all the multiple elastics. 

- General sewing supplies.

Now we are ready to get started on our reversible skirt.

I used the same amount of fabric for the width of my skirt as I did for my daughters , the more flare you want, the more fabric you should have. If you choose to use less fabric, be sure it's short enough so you can still walk in it! I made hers shorter of course, according to the measurement from her belly button to her knees.

Now onto Fabric A...

Step 7: For my daughter's skirts I sewed 2 elastics 1.5 cm apart and the first being 5cm (4cm finished) from the edge. For my skirt (see below), I sewed 4 elastics, 1cm apart and only 2cm ( 1cm finished) from the edge. I started off with more fabric on top, but found it added a lot of bulk and made me look "heavy". I'm very pleased with less fabric as it is much more flattering. Had I used less fabric, I might have made it more like my daughters. 

*** note: I made my daughters elastic a little looser, instead of removing 3cm to her waist measurement, I kept it as is. I also wanted her skirt to fall below her waist making it a little more comfortable as she is only 4. 

Here is a look at some of the details.

 And now for the photo shoot!

I thought I would make this side a little more dressed up, I paired the skirt with a vintage blouse both on me and my daughter.

You can see what is looks like from the back and side. Since this is a high waisted skirt and with lots of volume you don't need to worry about the making the front shorter than the back. 

And for the reverse side I thought of making it a little more casual looking. I paired the skirts with some basic tank tops, a belt and some sandals.

Now, I just wanted to let you know that I would never go out with my daughter looking like this all matchy-matchy from head to toe! This was in good fun for the photo shoot. I would be comfortable wearing the opposite side on Mother's day or for a special occasion. I am not too much into matching mother-daugther outfits, although I have to say this was fun and my daughter LOVED it!

and well, I just couldn't leave this photo out!

Lastly, my daughter loved twirling in her skirt. I am so happy I made hers nice and full. I also know she will be able to enjoy it for a couple years as she has plenty of room to grow into it.

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