I recently attended a textile fair held here in Tokyo, called Nuno-Haku. It was only after I checked all the details on the website that I realized I'd been to the same event last year! I guess I really enjoyed it, haha. 

I'm new to the whole crafting scene here in Tokyo - and in general - so it's a real treat when I can check out workshops and see pretty fabric on display. And let me tell you, there was a lot to see at this year's Nuno-Haku!

I loved how right at the entrance, there was a little board where you could pin where you had come from. 

I loved how right at the entrance, there was a little board where you could pin where you had come from. 

There was only a map of Japan, and not the world, so I chose Tokyo. 

There was only a map of Japan, and not the world, so I chose Tokyo. 

Exhibitors

Each year, they have a different way of displaying the event participants. I thought these lampshades were a pretty cute way of doing so.

Before I even entered the exhibition space, I was drawn in by the amazing smell of coffee and the sight of lunch preparations. It wasn't your usual food festa. Even the lunches were so pretty! Lots of organic and fresh ingredients, too. 

This stall was so popular that by the time I arrived, they had already sold out of their lunch boxes!

This stall was so popular that by the time I arrived, they had already sold out of their lunch boxes!

I have to admit I was a bit shy about taking photographs, so I didn't get that many, but here are some of the goodies that were on display. I wish I'd taken better note of things. My memory just isn't what it used to be... If you click on the photo, it should take you to the website. 

These pretty items are by OTSUKIYUMI.

These pretty items are by OTSUKIYUMI.

This was a demonstration by Kata-Kata.

This was a demonstration by Kata-Kata.

The image on the left is from the H-A-R-V-E-S-T booth, whereas the ones on the right I believe are from the Masashi Kondo booth. 

The image on the left is from the H-A-R-V-E-S-T booth, whereas the ones on the right I believe are from the Masashi Kondo booth

This was the Torten booth. 

This was the Torten booth. 

As you can see, it wasn't just about fabric. There were cards and foodstuffs, too! I was intrigued by that magazine that seemed to be dedicated to buttons and accessories. Maybe I should have bought it...

As you can see, it wasn't just about fabric. There were cards and foodstuffs, too! I was intrigued by that magazine that seemed to be dedicated to buttons and accessories. Maybe I should have bought it...

The Tegamisha booth area was probably one of the most popular. The line was sooooooo long! (They've got a Facebook page, too. Check it out!)

Okay, okay, I know you're waiting to see the nani IRO set-up (far right). Well, it was a bit tricky to get in there. There were so many people crowding around to see and touch the latest collection. They also had signed copies of Naomi Ito's book for sale. 

The nani IRO booth had pretty much all the fabrics from the current collection and some lovely garments for sale. I may or may not have picked up a little something to sew up for Mie's #sewjapan series. Heh heh.

Quite a few of the other exhibitors had ready-to-wear items as well, like these items from Pottenburn Tohkii.

I remember last year when I stopped by the Fujii + Fushikino booth. The colors are so gorgeous, and the dresses drape so beautifully. The ladies were very friendly, and said there is some English on the website. You can take a look at the styles they have available for purchase here.  

I didn't manage to participate in any of the workshops, but there were plenty of them (some of them require registration in advance)! I walked by a few of them thinking that my daughters would have loved the button-making one, the button-scooping one, or the felt animal workshop

This is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of everything that went on. You can find the full list of exhibitors (in Japanese) here. I'm looking forward to going again next year. Anyone care to join me? ;)

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