FASHION REVOLUTION DAY #INSIDEOUT #HANDMADEINSIDEOUT


Fashion is a force to be reckoned with. It celebrates, provokes, and entertains. And, today on April 24th 2014, it’s going to do even more. Because we’re turning fashion into a force for good.

On 24th April last year, 1133 people were killed and over 2500 were injured when the Rana Plaza factory complex collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Social and environmental catastrophes in our fashion supply chains continue.
Fashion Revolution Day says enough is enough.


So we are asking you today: Who Made Your Clothes?

Have you ever stopped to think about who makes your clothes? I mean not the name on the label, but the people actually working to make it happen.

We often hear about the designers, but how about the workers who picked the cotton, who wove, dyed, cut, sewed the fabric? When things are made locally, companies have more control over the workers conditions ( although sweatshops with poor conditions exist here too!) they pass by and inspect the manufacturing companies, they can assure everything is made under acceptable working conditions. When sending things to be made overseas- it's a little harder. 


How about the fabric? Have you seen pictures of cotton fields- we can talk about the environmental issues and pesticides but today lets talk about the men, woman and children who work the fields. Did you know they get paid by weight? So the faster and the more they work, the more money they take home. Have you ever tried picking cotton- it's brutal. 
How about dyeing? There are blue rivers in India because of the indigo dye that goes into making jeans and is dumped into the water. People bathe in this water and consequently have blue skin, also the workers who dye the jeans have a permanent blue hands. 


And how about the sewing? The working conditions and safety in some manufacturing companies are atrocious. Let's just think about what happen 1 year ago in collapse of the textile factory Rana Plaza in Dhaka, Bangladesh. 



Maybe we need to thinks about all this when we see a 5$ t-shirt. I know it is tempting but if you think of why and how that t-shirt is made then maybe just maybe it's no so tempting after all. So what can we do? I am not saying don't buy anything made overseas. These people need jobs. But maybe we can ask companies to tell us more about how and where the clothing is made. Try to buy locally. Buy organic or fair trade. Buy second hand clothing. Buy from smaller Indie Designers. Or how about you make your clothes. Maybe just try patching something up or up-cycling something. These are little things we can each do to make the Fashion Industry a little better and today lets shout it on the roof top... wear it #insideout or even better wear it #handmadeinsideout! Let's start a revolution... 


MissE is wearing all handmade items in these photos. It's not to late to join in the revolution, just post a photos of some clothing inside out on any social media with the hashtag #insideout and if you made it add the hashtag #handmadeinsideout 

For more details:

Don't forget to check out what Laura & Abby are wearing today and I'd like to thank them for putting together such a great project. 




5 comments:

  1. I agree 100%. I have long considered the ethics of which brands of clothing I buy, but after the Bangladesh fire where 112 people were killed making clothing for Gap and other major brands, I have officially stopped shopping at the mall except for rare occasions. Things are cheap to buy because they are cheaply made from cheap products. We don't need more cheap stuff made by people who are slaves or children. We need to reduce, reuse, and recycle more and make our own.

    And even buying fabric should be part of this thinking. The $5 a yard fabric from the big box fabric store is also likely made in a horrible factory. I try to look for better quality fabric made in Japan or Korea or Europe, if possible.

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  2. Thank you for this post Celina. We all know that for $5 t-shirts to exist, someone must be missing out and we can bet that it's not the big clothing retailers.

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  3. Great post Celina! I did not know about the blue rivers....so much more to this issue isn't there?!

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  4. Great post! Where is the share on Facebook-button?? This is one of the reasons I've started my bussiness. ♥

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  5. Great post Celina. It's such an important issue and so great that the handmade community are getting involved to spread the message as far as we can.

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